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Topics: Job Search, Workplace, Hiring, Training, Jobs, advancement, Career, Employment, Benefits, Work-Life Balance, Attrition, Employee Engagement, Communication, Goal Setting

 

You have spent a lot of time and effort choosing the right people for your team. You need your employees to come together and create a cohesive and effective team. As the team’s leader, you are responsible for your team’s success. Conflict damages the effectiveness of your team, and it is crucial that you take steps to repair the damage and restore the team’s relationships.

Identify the Issues

To resolve the conflict, you must first understand the conflict – allow your team members to talk about their concerns and actively listen to what they say as well and what they don’t say. Active listening requires the listener to concentrate, understand and respond to what is being said. Ask your team questions, look at non-verbal cues and put aside your own emotions and bias. The key here is to allow your team an opportunity to explain what you can improve and what is working for them.

Working Together

Cultivate the Right Team Culture

You understand the importance of your company’s culture to your success. However, each individual supports your company’s overall culture. A team culture that is collaborative and accountable will engage your team members in the success of the whole team. 

Once you have identified the issues or conflicts in your organization, you need to include your team in the discussion on how to improve. Your team must be a part of prioritizing the values and behaviours that are important to them. Including your team in this process will ensure that the team buys into the changes and feels ownership over the successful implementation.

 

Keep it Fun

Take time as a group to get together away from the stress and work in the office. A team building exercise doesn’t need to be tedious or expensive, something small like a lunchtime trivia game can encourage your team to come together to beat another team.

Team building

A fun event allows your team to relax, get to know each other outside of the office, and build relationships. Someone on your team might have a hobby or skill you don’t know about which can contribute to the success of the group. Get the team together to volunteer and give back to your community, go on a team lunch or have a dance break midday. The goal is to do something that will give your team a shared experience to remember when the work gets to be a lot.

Encourage Communication, From a Distance

Your goal as a team leader is to facilitate your team, not micromanage. Your team should be communicating without your supervision. As a leader you should be managing the team's expectations, not their tasks; the goal must be the outcome, not the activity. This method will let your team know that you trust them and will encourage greater innovation and communication.

You have invested in the training of your team, they are the subject matter experts, and you hired them to do a job – let them. Your team should know that they can lean on each other and draw on each other’s strengths and weaknesses and work together to succeed. Don’t fall into the trap of thinking that more control over your team translates into more efficiency.

 Dont micromanage

A team that works together will be more productive and successful, do you want to work with a great team? Click the button below and apply to work with Bill Gosling Outsourcing today.

WORKING AT BILL GOSLING

Ben Hubbard

Ben Hubbard

Ben joined Bill Gosling Outsourcing in 2002, progressing from Team Leader to Managing Coach of multiple Third-Party and FPO programs, into his current role as Program Lead overseeing Canadian 3rd Party Operations. Ben’s role is to maximize client market share potential by creating work flows, strategies, and ensuring sound inventory management. Ben’s passion away from the office is sports, having previously coached hockey in the GTHL and earning a spot in the Midget All-Star Game Showcase.

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